When Your Cup Is Almost Empty

When Your Cup Is Almost Empty

  "You can't pour from an empty cup." - Norm Kelly Whatever lessons we've learned about self-care, community care, and compassion fatigue have been amplified by the 2020 global pandemic. The stress and anxiety, the loneliness, the mental effort it takes to process, and the unknown finish line have been brought to the surface for not just chronic illness patients, but most everyone in the land. I've been in a comfortable place with my own IBD for some time now, and I've stated repeatedly that when you're in remission, it's your opportunity (if not obligation) to give back to those who are where you once were. After all, when I was disastrously sick, navigating a new diagnosis, and learning to live a life incurable, I took what I needed, and I found it from those who were so able to give, even when I had nothing to return at the time. Now that we're collectively experiencing a similar-but-also-way-different health crisis, I've found myself on...
Read More
Emily’s Clinical Trial Journey

Emily’s Clinical Trial Journey

Emily's Clinical Trial Journey Emily, like so many Crohn’s patients, has struggled with symptoms on and off for several years. She’s tried nearly every approved medication available, and on top of the everyday pain of dealing with disease, she’s got the added anxiety of feeling like she’s running out of options. Emily’s decision to enter a Crohn’s clinical trial comes from both her willingness to seek out another option, and her desire to contribute to research. Patients’ participation in drug trials are part of the Clinical Study portion of the FDA approval process, which includes 3 phases. Each progressing phase includes a greater number of trial patients, so the majority of experiences are part of Phase 3. This phase looks at effects on a larger population including demographics, considers side effects, and often uses drugs in combination with others. Previously, during Phase 1 and Phase 2, safety and effectiveness have already been tested. Hope for a 'Very Challenging Patient' I was first approached by...
Read More